Roger Federer’s career in numbers as he becomes oldest world No 1

Roger Federer became the oldest world No 1 in tennis history with victory against Robin Haase at the ABN Amro World Tennis Tournament in Rotterdam as he added another milestone in his remarkable career.

The 20-time Grand Slam champion has won three of the last five major honours and defended his Australian Open title in Melbourne to pull four clear from his great rival Rafael Nadal.

The Swiss player has enjoyed tremendous longevity in the sport and there appears to be no immediate intention for the 36-year-old to call it a day just yet.

Here, we pick out some key numbers and feats from Federer’s remarkable career.


Switzerland won their first Davis Cup at the 85th time of asking in 2014 and it was left to none other than Federer to secure the victory with a straight-sets success against France’s Richard Gasquet, despite coming into the tie in Lille with a back injury.

Federer became the first man to win the Wimbledon and US Open double four years in a row between 2004 and 2007.


Federer has won three Grand Slams in a calendar year on three separate occasions. He first did it in 2004 before he accomplished the feat in successive years (2006, 2007). Each time the French Open was the major title to elude his grasp.

The defence of his 2006 Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open titles the following season was the first time a male player had done so.


The Swiss great claimed his maiden Grand Slam success at Wimbledon in 2003 and won a further four consecutive Championships to equal Bjorn Borg’s haul at the All England Club.


Federer is now in a three-way tie with Novak Djokovic and Roy Emerson for men’s singles titles at the Australian Open.

The 36-year-old also holds a record high six end-of-season titles, but his last victory came in 2011.


His victory at Melbourne Park last month was the 10th time Federer has successfully defended a Slam title.


From 2012 to January 2017, Federer appeared unable to secure an 18th major title as he suffered three Slam final defeats – each time to Djokovic – but the Swiss player eventually put the negative memories to the past with a five-set victory over Nadal in the Australian Open final.


Federer extended his men’s record for Grand Slam singles titles to 20 in January. He is four ahead of Nadal and only four behind Margaret Court’s overall record.


The Swiss great reached his 30th Grand Slam final to date after Hyeon Chung retired injured in the Australian Open semi-final last month. No other player has been involved in so many major finals.


Federer holds a professional era record of 65 consecutive wins on grass which came to an end as he fell to a five-set defeat in a memorable encounter with Nadal at Wimbledon in 2008.


Thanks to his longevity in the sport, Federer has participated in the highest number of majors and was involved in 72 consecutive Grand Slam events from the Australian Open in 2000 until the 2016 French Open at Roland Garros.


Federer has won more matches at the Australian Open than any other man.


Federer is closing in on a century of Tour-level titles with 96 to his name. Only Jimmy Connors (109) has more.


From February 2004 to August 2008, Federer spent 237 consecutive weeks at the top of the ATP Rankings. This broke the previous record held by Pete Sampras (160) and saw him become the first player (male or female) ever to be at the top of the standings for more than 200 weeks in a row.

$2.3 million

Federer’s record career earnings have been boosted to the tune of $2.3 million.